About multimedia messages

Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about multimedia messages Multimedia Messaging Service. Users and providers may refer to such a message as a PXT, a picture message, or a multimedia message.

The most common use involves sending photographs from camera-equipped handsets. This section needs additional citations for verification. Multimedia messaging service was built using the technology of SMS messaging, first developed in 1984 as a captive technology which enabled service providers to “collect a fee every time anyone snaps a photo. Early MMS deployments were plagued by technical issues and frequent consumer disappointments. In recent years, MMS deployment by major technology companies have solved many of the early challenges through handset detection, content optimization, and increased throughput.

China was one of the early markets to make MMS a major commercial success, partly as the penetration rate of personal computers was modest but MMS-capable camera phones spread rapidly. The chairman and CEO of China Mobile said at the GSM Association Mobile Asia Congress in 2009 that MMS in China was now a mature service on par with SMS text messaging. Norwegian mobile subscribers sent on average one MMS per week. Between 2010 and 2013, MMS traffic in the U. 57 billion to 96 billion messages sent.

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This is due in part to the wide adoption of smartphones. MMS messages are delivered in a different way from SMS. Once the recipient’s MMSC has received a message, it first determines whether the receiver’s handset is “MMS capable”, that it supports the standards for receiving MMS. If the receiver’s handset is not MMS capable, the message is usually delivered to a web-based service from where the content can be viewed from a normal internet browser.

The URL for the content is usually sent to the receiver’s phone in a normal text message. This behavior is usually known as a “legacy experience” since content can still be received by a phone number, even if the phone itself does not support MMS. The method for determining whether a handset is MMS capable is not specified by the standards. A database is usually maintained by the operator, and in it each mobile phone number is marked as being associated with a legacy handset or not. This method is unreliable, however, because customers can independently change their handsets, and many of these databases are not updated dynamically.

MMS does not utilize operator-maintained “data” plans to distribute multimedia content, which is only used if the operator clicks links inside the message. E-mail and web-based gateways to the MMS system are common. Handset configuration can cause problems sending and receiving MMS messages. Content adaptation: Multimedia content created by one brand of MMS phone may not be entirely compatible with the capabilities of the recipient’s MMS phone. Bulk messaging: The flow of peer-to-peer MMS messaging involves several over-the-air transactions that become inefficient when MMS is used to send messages to large numbers of subscribers, as is typically the case for VASPs. For example, when one MMS message is submitted to a very large number of recipients, it is possible to receive a delivery report and read-reply report for each and every recipient. Handset Configuration: Unlike SMS, MMS requires a number of handset parameters to be set.

Poor handset configuration is often blamed as the first point of failure for many users. WAP Push: Few mobile network operators offer direct connectivity to their MMSCs for content providers. This has resulted in many content providers using WAP push as the only method available to deliver ‘rich content’ to mobile handsets. Although the standard does not specify a maximum size for a message, 300 kB is the current recommended size used by networks due to some limitations on the WAP gateway side.

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