C programme for matrix multiplication

BASIC programs at the same time. The emergence of early microcomputers in the mid-1970s led to the development c programme for matrix multiplication the original Microsoft BASIC in 1975.

Due to the tiny main memory available on these machines, often 4 kB, a variety of Tiny BASIC dialects were also created. Kemeny was the math department chairman at Dartmouth College, and largely on his reputation as an innovator in math teaching, in 1959 they won an Alfred P. 500,000 to build a new department building. These did not progress past a single freshman class.

New experiments using Fortran and ALGOL followed, but Kurtz concluded these languages were too tricky for what they desired. Kemeny wrote the first version of BASIC. The acronym BASIC comes from the name of an unpublished paper by Thomas Kurtz. The first version BASIC language was released on 1 May 1964. One of the graduate students on the implementation team was Sr. Mary Kenneth Keller, one of the first people in the U.

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PhD in computer science and the first woman to do so. Initially, BASIC concentrated on supporting straightforward mathematical work, with matrix arithmetic support from its initial implementation as a batch language, and character string functionality being added by 1965. Wanting use of the language to become widespread, its designers made the compiler available free of charge. During this period a number of simple computer games were written in BASIC, most notably Mike Mayfield’s Star Trek. A number of these were collected by DEC employee David H.

Ahl and published in a newsletter he compiled. The introduction of the first microcomputers in the mid-1970s was the start of explosive growth for BASIC. It had the advantage that it was fairly well known to the young designers and computer hobbyists who took an interest in microcomputers. One of the first BASICs to appear was Tiny BASIC, a simple BASIC variant designed by Dennis Allison at the urging of Bob Albrecht of the Homebrew Computer Club. Almost universally, home computers of the 1980s had a ROM-resident BASIC interpreter, which the machines booted directly into.

As the popularity of BASIC grew in this period, computer magazines published complete source code in BASIC for video games, utilities, and other programs. Given BASIC’s straightforward nature, it was a simple matter to type in the code from the magazine and execute the program. When IBM was designing the IBM PC they followed the paradigm of existing home computers in wanting to have a built-in BASIC. By that time, computers running Windows 3. 1 had become fast enough that many business-related processes could be completed “in the blink of an eye” even using a “slow” language, as long as large amounts of data were not involved.

Many small business owners found they could create their own small, yet useful applications in a few evenings to meet their own specialized needs. Eventually, during the lengthy lifetime of VB3, knowledge of Visual Basic had become a marketable job skill. Many other BASIC dialects have also sprung up since 1990, including the open source QB64 and FreeBASIC, inspired by QBasic, and the Visual Basic-styled RapidQ, Basic For Qt and Gambas. Variants of BASIC are available on graphing and otherwise programmable calculators made by Texas Instruments, HP, Casio, and others.

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