Framework vs programming language

Haskell features a type system with type inference and lazy evaluation. Haskell is based on the semantics, but not the syntax, of the language Miranda, which served to focus framework vs programming language efforts of the initial Haskell working group. Following the release of Miranda by Research Software Ltd. 1985, interest in lazy functional languages grew.

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By 1987, more than a dozen non-strict, purely functional programming languages existed. In late 1997, the series culminated in Haskell 98, intended to specify a stable, minimal, portable version of the language and an accompanying standard library for teaching, and as a base for future extensions. The committee expressly welcomed creating extensions and variants of Haskell 98 via adding and incorporating experimental features. In February 1999, the Haskell 98 language standard was originally published as The Haskell 98 Report.

In January 2003, a revised version was published as Haskell 98 Language and Libraries: The Revised Report. In early 2006, the process of defining a successor to the Haskell 98 standard, informally named Haskell Prime, began. This was intended to be an ongoing incremental process to revise the language definition, producing a new revision up to once per year. Haskell 2010 is an incremental update to the language, mostly incorporating several well-used and uncontroversial features previously enabled via compiler-specific flags.

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