Ruby as a programming language

Jump to navigation Jump to search Ruby as a programming language article is about the programming language. Not to be confused with Ruby on Rails.

According to the creator, Ruby was influenced by Perl, Smalltalk, Eiffel, Ada, and Lisp. Matsumoto has said that Ruby was conceived in 1993. I was talking with my colleague about the possibility of an object-oriented scripting language. The object-oriented language seemed very promising. Matsumoto describes the design of Ruby as being like a simple Lisp language at its core, with an object system like that of Smalltalk, blocks inspired by higher-order functions, and practical utility like that of Perl. The name “Ruby” originated during an online chat session between Matsumoto and Keiju Ishitsuka on February 24, 1993, before any code had been written for the language.

Initially two names were proposed: “Coral” and “Ruby”. Matsumoto chose the latter in a later e-mail to Ishitsuka. The first public release of Ruby 0. 95 was announced on Japanese domestic newsgroups on December 21, 1995. Subsequently, three more versions of Ruby were released in two days. Following the release of Ruby 0. In 1997, the first article about Ruby was published on the Web.

In the same year, Matsumoto was hired by netlab. In 1998, the Ruby Application Archive was launched by Matsumoto, along with a simple English-language homepage for Ruby. In 1999, the first English language mailing list ruby-talk began, which signaled a growing interest in the language outside Japan. By 2000, Ruby was more popular than Python in Japan. In September 2000, the first English language book Programming Ruby was printed, which was later freely released to the public, further widening the adoption of Ruby amongst English speakers. 8 was initially released August 2003, was stable for a long time, and was retired June 2013.

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Although deprecated, there is still code based on it. 8 is only partially compatible with Ruby 1. 8 has been the subject of several industry standards. Around 2005, interest in the Ruby language surged in tandem with Ruby on Rails, a web framework written in Ruby. Rails is frequently credited with increasing awareness of Ruby. 9 was released on Christmas Day in 2007. 3, released October 31, 2011, Ruby switched from being dual-licensed under the Ruby License and the GPL to being dual-licensed under the Ruby License and the two-clause BSD license.

9 was slowed by changes from 1. 9 introduces many significant changes over the 1. 9 has been obsolete since February 23, 2015, and it will no longer receive bug and security fixes. Users are advised to upgrade to a more recent version. 0 is intended to be fully backward compatible with Ruby 1.

It has been obsolete since February 22, 2016, and it will no longer receive bug and security fixes. 0 was released on Christmas Day in 2013. The release includes speed-ups, bugfixes, and library updates. 0, Ruby’s versioning policy is more like semantic versioning. MAJOR: Increased when you make incompatible API changes. MINOR: increased every Christmas, may be API incompatible.

MINOR: increased when you add functionality in a backwards-compatible manner. TEENY: security or bug fix which maintains API compatibility. PATCH: increased when you make backwards-compatible bug fixes. Semantic versioning also provides additional labels for pre-release and build metadata are available as extensions to the MAJOR. PATCH format, not available at Ruby. 1 has been obsolete since April 1, 2017, and it will no longer receive bug and security fixes.

0 was released on Christmas Day in 2014. The release includes speed-ups, bugfixes, and library updates and removes some deprecated APIs. 1, Ruby MRI performance on PowerPC64 was improved. 0 was released on Christmas Day in 2015. The ability to mark all string literals as frozen by default with a consequently large performance increase in string operations. Foo Baz can now be retrieved by profile. Net::FTP connections, and Rake being removed from stdlib.

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